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20121205
20121213
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and getting that. >> it's a statement. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. also on the radar this morning, after president obama and house speaker john boehner both were tight-lipped how the negotiations went. the co-founder of the fix the debt campaign, he was asked about the chances of striking a deal to avoid the cliff. >> it's probably more like a 40% chance we'll actually get it done before the end of the year. probably 25% chance we'll get it done right after the end of the year. and then there's that horrible 35% chance that we'll still go over the cliff and have pure chaos. but i think the chances of getting it done now are better. i think that's what's key. >> be sure to tune in tomorrow for the fiscal cliff coverage live from washington. mission critical, rise above d.c., all day long. becky quick, jim cramer, maria bartiromo holding their feet to the fire about where they stand on the fiscal cliff and how they'll do their part to rise above partisan politics and reach a deal. now, there are some bowles comments. 40%, yeah, but the odds are much better. they're still 35% chance
's absolutely right, carl. a lot of people have been drawing similarities between the current fiscal cliff negotiations and that debt ceiling standoff from last year. so we have one former insider who joins us right now. he's been through this before. he probably knows how to read the signs better than just about anybody out there. bill daley was the white house chief of staff under president obama during the debt ceiling negotiations last year. mr. daley, thank you very much for joining us this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: we were just trying to figure out what to make of this. all morning long we've been saying it's relatively good news that we haven't within hearing from the principalprincipals. what does it mean now that speaker boehner is going to be addressing the house at noon. >> i think it's a strong sign there is movement. i don't know that. i'm not on the inside. i don't know what's going on. i doubt the speaker is going to stand up and speak to the body and say nothing's happening and we're not going anywhere and just give a partisan speech. so i'm hopeful tha
is standing in the way now of a fiscal cliff solution. we're back in two. >>> it wasn't until the debt ceiling lauz but born with an . >> you know, i beg to differ, mr. president. to me, i understand the use of its is a weapon but to me the real problem isn't the debt ceiling. it's the debt. the debt is the problem. you know, to have an unlimited amount of money to call upon is too much power power for one person. it's always in our country been about checks and balances but i think this administration just wants more checks and no balancing of the checkbook. that isn't the kind of check and balance that i think the people that wrote the constitution had in mind. now, let's look at it a different way, when we think of, you know, some good entertainment, there's, you know, bob hope, the road to morocco, the road to singapore. i don't think that we want to have a movie someday called the road to the weimar republic because bob hope was in the old movies. there's no hope in that new movie and i think this issue really has to be discussed. now i understand there's issues about compromise and every
speaker john boehner who is making an announcement on the fiscal cliff right now. >> his promise to bring a balanced approach is mainly tax hikes. and does not solve our debt crisis, it increases spending. our plan meets these standards, cuts spending and paves the way for real job growth in our country. in the five weeks since we've signaled our willingness to forge an agreement with the president, he's never put forth a plan that meets these standards. and frankly, it's why we don't have an agreement today. the longer the white house slow walks this discussion, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff, and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> good morning. the president has said on a daily basis that we should be passing a balanced plan. but what we hear from the president is continuing only discussion on one side of the ledger. it has always been about tax rate increases, and nothing about spending. and we insist, say, look, mr. president, let's talk about a balanced plan, but where are your specifics on the spending cuts? even his own advisers say that any kind of
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4